Homemade Nutty Falafel

Super crunchy on the outside and light and fluffy inside, this falafel delivers a delicious flavour combination – fresh herbs, nuts with a wonderful spicy finish of ginger and chilli.

Super crunchy on the outside and light and fluffy inside, this falafel delivers a delicious flavour combination – fresh herbs, nuts with a wonderful spicy finish of ginger and chilli.Ingredients:

  • 300g dry chickpeas
  • 50g pecans
  • 50g fresh coriander; chopped
  • 30g fresh flat leaf parsley; chopped
  • 3 large cloves of garlic; halved
  • ~2cm piece of fresh ginger; peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 medium size onion; roughly chopped
  • 1tbsp spelt flour
  • 1 1/2tsp salt
  • 1 1/2tsp black pepper
  • 1tsp cumin
  • 1/2tsp chilli flakes
  • ~100ml olive oil for frying
  • 1.5l water for soaking

Method:

Pour 1.5l litre of filtered water to a pot, add the chickpeas, pop the lid on and leave to soak for at least 10h (overnight works best).

When you are ready to make your falafel, drain the chickpeas then pop them into a food processor.

Add all other ingredients spreading them evenly around the processor bowl but leaving the pecans to be added last. They will help to weigh down the fresh herbs, which means that everything will better stay in place while mixing.

Use the pulse function until your mixture is coarse to semi-coarse. Do not over pulse / mix or you will end up with a hummus-like texture, which isn’t ideal for falafels.

Once done, remove the blade from your food processor and start forming your falafels. I used an ice-cream scoop to measure mine out and the mixture should yield 24 almost perfect balls of falafel 🙂

Super crunchy on the outside and light and fluffy inside, this falafel delivers a delicious flavour combination – fresh herbs, nuts with a wonderful spicy finish of ginger and chilli.Do not squeeze your mixture too much as this will make it dense and remove moisture from it, which will result in dry falafels later on. If you are struggling to form your desired shape you can:

  1. Pop the blade back on your processor and pulse few more times.
  2. Pop it into the fridge to help firm it up a bit
  3. Or worst case scenario add some eggs to help it glue together, but you really shouldn’t need to do this, if you followed the measurements as stated.

Once all your falafels have their final shape, it’s time to fry!

Super crunchy on the outside and light and fluffy inside, this falafel delivers a delicious flavour combination – fresh herbs, nuts with a wonderful spicy finish of ginger and chilli.In a heavy bottomed frying pan, ideally a small cast iron one, preheat 100ml of olive oil (or more if you pan is bigger, ideally you are aiming for enough oil in the pan to cover half of your falafel).

Bring the oil up to 180C before popping your falafels in. Do not over crowd the pan. I cook 6 at the time despite having space for 12 or even 15. More falafels at one time popped into the pan means a bigger drop in the oil temperature once you put them in (this will result in your falafel soaking up the oil making them greasy) and a general inability to turn them with ease, so take it easy and fry them in batches.

When I fry the oil drops to 170C, this is temperature of my oil once all new falafels are in. I heat it up to 180C again as quickly as possible before turning the heat down and cook for about 5-6 minutes turning regularly

When done remove with a slotted spoon and place on some kitchen roll to soak up any residual oil.

Serve warm or cold with a green salad or go classic and add into a wrap.

Most importantly of all though… enjoy!

Do you like falafel?

What’s your favourite way of serving them?

Super crunchy on the outside and light and fluffy inside, this falafel delivers a delicious flavour combination – fresh herbs, nuts with a wonderful spicy finish of ginger and chilli.

Fresh Herbs Guide – what goes well with what?

Fresh Herbs Guide – what goes well with whatFresh living herbs can transform a good dish into an amazing one. They can add an incredible rich aroma, more flavour and that something special, which can elevate your dish to the next level.

By all means, I am not suggesting ditching dry herbs all together but having a fresh living herb garden is really something every cook should think about… yes, I know that not everyone has a garden or space for it but let’s be honest how much space do herbs really need? All that is required is some free window sill space, a few pots and some soil… and if this is still way too much hassle for you, why don’t you look into a complete herb set which can be planted in the box it came in.

We love fresh herbs and there is always something green growing on my kitchen window sill. A few basil leaves added into a simple tomato sauce can make all the difference… or a few mint leaves chopped and mix with your potato salad… sometimes fresh herbs is all you need to create a culinary masterpiece.

If you are new to fresh herbs I’ve put together a simple guide as to which herbs go well with what.

Basil pairs well with: tomatoes, garlic, fruit, peas, aubergines, green salad, squash, eggs, cheese, potatoes, pasta

Bay leaf pairs well with: all kind of soups and stews, sauces and marinades which need to rest for a while

Coriander pairs well with: curry, BBQ, garlic, lemon, green salad

Dill pairs well with: fish, potatoes, fish, beets, pickles, lemon

Marjoram pairs well with: cheese, eggs, basil, garlic, corn, meat

Mint pairs well with: jellies, fruit juices, candies, frosting, cakes, pies, pork, potatoes, peas and chocolate

Oregano pairs well with: tomato, pasta sauces, basil, onion

Parsley pairs well with: all kind of soups and stews, green salad, eggs, cheese

Rosemary pairs well with: lamb, pork, chicken, carrot, potatoes, garlic and tomato

Thyme pairs well with: soups, pasta sauces, potato, rice, tomato, potatoes

The list goes on and on, the more you learn the more there is to discover, it is a journey and one I implore you to start if you have even the slightest inclination in the kitchen.

If you like my herb pairing you might want to check the full flavour profiles post.

Do you use fresh living herbs in your cooking?

What is your all-time favourite use of fresh herbs?

*Post written for Spalding Bulb blogger herb challenge.